fresh-baked thoughts about my recent #LINQ2015 experience

It was definitely a very fruitful, or should I say chocolaty, experience. When boarding the plane from Manchester to Brussels, I didn’t know what to expect except the weather,if the forecast was right: sunshine, It was my very first LINQ conference.

In a country and city I had never been before and where my language skills really let me down… this was so  frustrating,,, not being able to use the Internet to navigate through Brussels was an experience in itself and really proved how much we rely on digital technology. It did feel strange not to be able to use Google all the time and find my way through the city. Maybe especially because of my lack of French…. but I managed in the end.

It was lovely to be among colleagues from around Europe. Greece was represented very generously, I have to say. The theme of the conference seemed to echo the OER15 conference earlier this year and the main question open as default was challenged. I had the opportunity to find out about a number of really interesting mainly funded projects in different education sectors. The keynotes really framed the conference. It was great to hear Bono Richter from the European Commission to express his support for grassroots innovation in the area of open education. But he did remind us that open education is not really new. Sharing of ideas, resources and practices always happens among teachers. Bono expressed a difficulty the Commission is facing to develop teachers skills and competencies across Europe. He asked us: “How do we ensure our teachers know how to teach?” A bit earlier Prof. Alexander Khoroshilov from UNESCO highlighted also the importance of developing teachers and develop sustainable solutions for professional development. What are the possibilities and how does the knowledge society fit in with this but also the right of every citizen of our world for primary, secondary and further education (is higher education included in this? I am not sure and didn’t ask the question?..) Alexander and others really highlighted the important role of the teacher in education more generally but also open education. But not a teacher we used to know. This put a smile on my face and links nicely with my thoughts and practice. Our new Open Facilitator Project, an informal collaboration among MMU, the open Knowledge Foundation and Carol Yeager will hopefully shed some light around this and the very first collection of open facilitator stories as well.

Grainne Conole’s keynote was interesting as it brought out some of the dangers. Too often we seem to place ourselves in a soft bubble where everything is lovely, sweet and caring… but what happens when this bursts? Nasty things can and do happen… And we feel uncomfortable, vulnerable and hopeless. Some won’t have the strength to pick themselves up again… but how often can you pick yourself up again, before you had enough? So what is the answer? Grainne mentioned that technologies are pervasive and the book Information Bomb by Paul Virilio  mentioned around this sounded really interesting and I am looking forward to reading it.

Prof. Alan Bruce’s talk linked nicely with parts of Grainne’s keynote as well as Alexander’s. Alan approached it from an inclusivity angle and alarmed us that the imbalance is actually increasing and that we live in denial. Is open education exclusive? We talk about shared prosperity – but is this a reality for all? Others have written about it too. Prof. Andy Lane’s work springs to mind.

Project and enquiry-based learning featured strongly as pedagogical approached used on a number of projects, mainly from the school sector. as well as the need to collaborate among institutions was highlighted in a number of projects across Europe.

The Inspiring Science Education is an ambitious and .very useful project with partners across Europe that connects STEM school teachers, enables them to share resources and connect with other teachers in communities based on their interest and needs. There seems to be an emphasis on creating and sharing learning scenarios and learning through enquiry and problems. examples from Romania, Belgium and Greece were shared. One of the speakers said characteristically: “today is about collaborative problem-solving“. What a fantastic idea. How can we make this happen for HE? I am wondering if JORUM would be open to develop community features and explore if this would or could increase the use of the repository, sharing, development and collaboration among practitioners in HE and more widely.

The CAMEI project presented by Dr Stathis Konstantinidis from Nottingham University  in the area of medical education is producing useful findings and frameworks that can be taken further by other practitioners in medical education but also more widely. I am looking forward to discussing opportunities for collaboration with Dr Stathis Konstantinidis in the near future but also with Dr Nicos Fachantidis from the University of Macedonia who has an interest in playful learning among other things and the three of us had really good discussions (in Greek) during the conference.

Dr Yves Punie’ talk on the second day was really useful too as it provided an up-to-date insight into the research the Commission is currently doing in the area of open education, Preliminary findings from a survey shared with universities across Europe about open education showed some interesting results. The replies around why open, were left me wondering… Universities seem to engage in open primarily to extend reach (marketing tool?) and do public good (which is great). For universities across Europe at appears to be less about reducing costs. What I missed completely was the desire by universities to connect learners and teachers to learn collaboratively within and across wider and more distributed communities that have the potential to enrich learning experiences. Isn’t this one of the great advantages of open education?

A mini conversation I had with Grainne and Yves about formal, informal and non-formal learning was also useful and I think it did help me understand the difference between informal and non-formal learning which I had found confusing. I think it makes sense now ;) Must check with my dear Sue.

Looking forward to keeping in touch with colleagues I met at LINQ2015 and see were this journey will take us.

3 + 1 #OER15 useful reminders in pics

1. Think first! What is appropriate? Image source https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7690/17013144658_52acb232e8_z.jpg

2. We all have something to offer! Give something back. image source https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8800/16578453174_901842f9db_z.jpg

3. We are a resource. Image source: https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7679/17201058641_51ff081a2d_z.jpg

+ 1: Room for all! What can we learn from each other? image source https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7641/16579203184_c886c5c4e8_z.jpg

Special thank you to Cable, Josie, Sheila and Martin for their keynotes! Access also Martin’s blog post here where you will find a playlist to all keynote videos. Thank you also to Simon for organising together the social programme…. and my brand new stylus ;) Looking forward to working closer with Marieke and the open facilitator stories project and keeping in touch with old and new friends.

#OER15 really valuable experience overall in so many ways.

Exploring the Issue of Play, open invite to contribute to the next CAM issue @academiccreator

Play in higher education? Seriously?

Often we are reminded that universities are not playgrounds and that play is childish and inappropriate… Isn’t research a playful experimentation with ideas, concepts and situations, recognised as an essential activity that drives innovation, while play in a learning and teaching context at this level is often still interpreted as undesirable especially within higher education? In the next issue of the openly-licensed Creative Academic Magazine, we will explore the importance of play in higher education to create critical and creative thinkers and doers who have the curiosity, capacity and the vision to make the impossible possible.  There will be a potpourri of contributions and perspectives shared through practitioners and students eyes and minds that offer a valuable insight into the opportunities creative play presents for learning and teaching, students and their tutors. We are looking for articles that are written in a vibrant and accessible language, ideally around 500 – 1500 words max. Media-rich resources are also very welcome as this is a digital edition. Contributors will be asked to submit a doodle of themselves together with a short, 50 word bio, written in a creative way.

All voices are welcome!!!

If you would like to contribute to our survey around play in HE, please click here. Please share this invite with others who might also be interested. The deadline to submit an article is the 1st of May. Chrissi Nerantzi and Dr Alison James http://www.creativeacademic.uk/ https://youtu.be/HHwXlcHcTHc

Messy and sticky learning or workshop 5 #creativehe

All workshops linked to the Creativity for Learning unit are now over… well officially they are. But we did manage to add two more. I didn’t, my students did, which was wonderful. These extra sessions will be peer led. There will be a workshop around academic posters and one around action research. Plus monthly tutorials with me and online support. How will our action research groups work? They have been naturally formed through self-selection and it will be very interesting to see how this will work for us all. Is the new online community space going to work? Not everybody has signed up yet… this has been a major issue for me… put perhaps less fir my students? I heard one of them saying that they enjoy the face-to-face sessions so much that they don’t think the online can add anything? I need some further information regarding this as I will be offering the unit again in September. I have been thinking of specific changes already but discussing these with my current cohort will be really valuable.

Ok, let’s go back to workshop 5…
I was extremely excited about this one, but then I am always excited when I put my sessions together as I just love the suspense and surprise factor. I do think that when we enjoy what we do as teachers, the potential that our students will also enjoy it. Now, of course enjoyment doesn’t necessarily mean learning. It us important to remember this but also the fact that negative emotions and discomfort can also lead to learning. I am focusing on the suspense-factor that triggers enjoyment and discomfort as it is about experiencing the unexpected. This keeps us alert, excited. It also stimulates our thinking and action and increases our playfulness, I think.
This workshop took place in a studio were we could be messy and make learning stick, literally and metaphorically. The idea was to use unwanted resources – a sustainable solution? – to create visual masterpieces of our learning linked to specif theories and approaches that could be considered in the context of our innovation projects.

our stuff: recycling, upcycling in action, image source https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8650/16726861801_0802c263d3_z.jpg

For me, personally, this was very unorthodox, if you like, as I prefer building theory though practice, but it is not about how I like to do things, or at least what I dislike should not stop me from exploring these approaches with my students and help me reflect in these practices and approaches and use them as opportunities to develop my practice further. I could see a value in doing it that way but still felt that it was very abstract and detouched from personal and professional realities. I tried to bring in context but am not sure if I achieved this. I think the conversations that the action research groups had, somehow evidenced that there was some of this happening, which was good. Thinking now back at my instructions, I think a specific scenario could have helped further? I need to think about it a bit more…
It was wonderful to observe the sets. I just loved the way they worked together and how the masterpieces emerged through rotated collaboration. I was really impressed with the level of engagement and the commitment to the task. Using elements of the Word Cafe approach worked and while we didn’t have a lot of time, progressively the groups did speed up and were more focused, which meant that activities took less time. Were the groups also in flow?

collaborative installations, theory in 3D image source https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8666/16107973283_bcf712a6b6_z.jpg

The Value Jar is now full. Below are the responses from this workshop. A quick Wordle has been included in the slideshare further down. What follows are the responses from the 5th workshop.
The theories we were studying and representing within the session were demonstrated in practice by the way the tasks were constructed: it allowed for planning, action, discussion and reflection. Everyone’s different skills and strengths were brought together to create a strong visual. You (Chrissi) stepped in with specific assistance when we needed to focus on certain things more.
It allowed to discover a number of different theories in active way which involved research, discussion and creation. Visualisating ideas helped me to understand the concept. Visualisations helped to facilitate discussion in a group.
The session linked academic theory to the practical. Each group’s understanding of the theory drove ideas in different directions. Diversity is great!!
The best one! Making is learning and learning is knowing you are able to make sense of things in pictures, ideas, balloons, people smile ;)
“Vizualise” thoughts and ideas make them easier to understand.
An innovative way to explore theory, sharing the inportance of using visual and creative elements as well as text. Also an enriching opportunity to ? How to do critical reflection/analogies with students. Much food for thought in practice.
I am going to try something like this next week – a modified vresion! I am aware of my own “issues” with visual representations!
Working together to discuss theories and using the discussion to make an image really helped me to explore ideas and check my understanding. It was fun too!
Being able to bounce off other peoples energy when mine was low. Diagrams made theory much more digestable for me.
Working as a group/collaboratively to farm a shared understanding of complex theories. Loved how visual it was and how the installations grew.
I am also adding a slideshare I have put together to capture our first term together. This is the first draft at the moment (7 March 15) which needs to be updated with a few more things and I will do this over the next few weeks.
A bit sad that our workshops came to an end. However, I know that this is just the beginning and am really looking forward to what is still to come, our collaborative working, your innovations and a ther projects which are emerging already. On our list are so far
  • contributions from the whole group for the next Creative Academic Magazine around play
  • a collaborative paper using the above as open research data
  • evaluating the workshops based on the content of the Value Jar, I would like to do this with the group as well.
More ideas will emerge, I am sure, they always do when we enjoy what we do, enjoy working with each other and see value in the professional relationships that develop out of these.

Patiently waiting with closed eyes! Thank you all. I hope you will be using your brand new shiny badges, image source https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8651/16105612164_78486a6908_z.jpg

Thank you David and Haleh in preparation for this workshop, especially with the boards and painting these!!!, Ellie for designing our badges and all for participating so actively in this workshop and the previous ones. Your help and openness made a huge difference to how we experienced these weeks together.
See you again soon.
Chrissi
ps. Draft No. 2
pps. Gentle reminder at https://tellagami.com/gami/8U8Y2E/

To play or not to play? or week 4 #creativeHE

Don’t bin your ideas! Share them and see them grow and evolve! image source https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7365/16582973125_a708f17c86_z.jpg

Friday evening and finally a little bit of time to look back at our last gathering this Thursday (it is actually Sunday morning when I am adding these notes to WordPress after I started writing them in notes on my iPad on Friday evening). Does it matter? Perhaps this delay is actually healthy for reflection? I noticed this time that it was more valuable to add bits over a few days and I know I will be coming back and editing further after I will have published this post. Thinking is messy, reflections are messy, trying to put them in a linear arrangement is not an easy task as the mind just keeps hopping around… and seeing new and exciting connections all the time… Where to stop? What to analyse? What to do? Can we afford to ignore internal voices? But what also about the external ones? All go into the sense making pot, I think.

What do we ask our students to do at university? image source https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7427/15963336273_cfae0bf4c3_z.jpg

On Thursday we played with small colourful plastic bricks, a mountain of them as you can see from the photos. The purpose was to experience a model-based learning approach that has the potential to foster pan-participation through playful making, sharing reflection, learning, ideas and dilemmas based on models we create and the metaphors they represent. Do we find it more natural to externalise our deepest internal thoughts through metaphors? Are we making emotional connections stronger that way without even realising? What are the implications?

Sharing our stories through models, image source https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7349/15963013413_f0f09e7a47_z.jpg

We used Lego bricks and the LEGO Serious Play (LSP) method or at least a variation of it. For me it is important, with anything I use, to make sure that it could work for the specific learning situation. Could it work as it is, or do I need to make adjustments? Often, perhaps too often, we don’t ask ourselves these important questions and are then surprised when things we try don’t work… well, not everything we try works anyway, but removing our own criticality can make it even worse? For me it is extremely important to be flexible, proactive and adjust approaches when needed so that what we do is of value and participants get the maximum out of it. But also provide choice! Asking ourselves how and why we do something are perhaps more important to what we do… if that makes sense and I can parallels here when we are given “stuff” to deliver and we often feel constrained… but within these constraints lie the real opportunities, we just need to spot them and do something about them! This often means taken risks… and trying something new. What are the implications of not trying something new? Perhaps this is a valuable question we should ask ourselves more often…

our Kerry facilitating the LSP warm-up activities, image source https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8623/15960948864_acffde588a_z.jpg

As soon as the bricks appeared on the table in little plastic bags, they didn’t really stay there for very long… Colleagues took them out of the bags and started putting little models together. This just happened. I have seen it before, it seems to happen all the time, and confirms to me that it is really hard   not to touch the bricks and play with them. It almost feels as if the bricks are magic and turn us again into a child where we enjoy play and are curious about the world and share this openly with others without guilt or shame.

we all reflect, we all build! image source https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7412/16582202292_051e139af4_z.jpg

Inviting a colleague who participated in the LEGO for Higher Education workshop series a few months ago and therefore had some experience of the LSP method already also through implementing it in their own practice, worked really well. Kerry made me smile throughout as I could see that the key messages and concepts of the approach were there and enacted successfully. It was also a lovely change I think from me introducing and leading learning activities. We talk about empowering learners and putting the learner in the driving seat… but too often we are still the ones orchestrating everything even if we achive an active participatory learning experience!!! Is this really student-centred learning? Perhaps it is a mild form of it. But we can and should do more? What will help us let go? I think scaffolding the process that leads to autonomy is really vital and I think creating the conditions for empowerment and autonomy are  important. Then we can switch. Explaining our intentions, expectations, the process and approach to the learners is, I think important so that they recognise why this is good for them, their learning and development.

We learn so much through teaching others and often forget that it is actually one of most effective ways of learning. But could students misinterpret our intentions? Could they just turn around and say “I am the student” and refuse our invite to take a more leading. mentoring, supporting role of their peers? For me it is also a way to recognise expertise and mastery in students and this is a good thing, right? I think some do and will be vocal about it too! How could we manage this? What would you do? Peer mentoring and peer assisted learning are perhaps still approaches widely under-used, is this right? What needs to happen so that we value such approaches more and integrate them more organically in our sessions and courses? Helping others, just because we want to and we can, can be motivational and boost our confidence and self-belief for example, they can also boost our understanding of the subject. I have seen financial rewards been used to promote such practices. Is there any related research out there that confirms that this works? Reading this HEA publication might help gain further insights.

 

Value Jar responses from this week. Could not read all responses, unfortunately.

It is amazing how we have new ideas from making things.
The activities in play, should be introduced as a fun activity to introduce the method. as the weeks develop more challenging activities in play should occur. Students should be given an explanation of the activities so they understand the reasons behind the activities. A new and exciting method to develop students.
Being able to visualise what I might not have been able to visualise at the start of the session.
Today’s session allowed me to explore the idea of using LEGO as a basis for the discussion of quite personal feelings and ideas. Explaining knowledge and understanding in a new and interesting way.
It was interesting to do the LEGO tasks again and to act as a facilitator. These sessions give me time to think and litter my thinking between sessions.
Playing with ideas leads to innovation. Making allows us to find new points (evads – couldn’t read handwriting, need to confirm) we can (… again, couldn’t read handwriting) ideas. Reflecting on our making helps us to understand our ideas, knowledge.
I think I could use LEGO as a way of students finding it easier to talk about their work: through a representation of their work, it takes the pressure off a bit.
I think it is wonderful that people are so excited to come and are sharing ideas withe ach other with no guardedness.
Excellent session to link theory to practice. Using LEGO makes me keep silent. Silent is good for my creativity.
LEGO – exploring ideas, creatively through play. Building/growing, very practical demonstration. Value using Lego in learning. Good for building team/group.

My favourite pic of he day ;) image source https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7444/16395780350_95025bea89_z.jpg

I think play won on Thursday, with and without LEGO, we showed that it can make us feel more relaxed, open up, connect with our inner self and others and make exciting new discoveries. Stuart Brown in his book Play. How it shapes the brain, opens the imagination and invigorates the soul wrote:

Play isn’t the enemy of learning, it’s learning’s partner. Play is like fertilizer for brain growth. It’s crazy not to use it. (p. 101)

While the following might help some more skeptics, especially when thinking about play in higher education…

Next week will be our sort of reading week. A peer-led session by Susan and Emma focusing in on our portfolios, assessment and the online space. I will be with you in spirit and am looking forward to finding out how it went.

See you all on the 5th of March in the Studio. Info will follow nearer to the time. I can’t wait to see you then. I might be more excited about this as anybody else at the moment as I am the only one who knows what is going to happen ;)

Chrissi


 

I am part of the Creative Academic team together with Dr Alison James and led by Prof. Norman Jackson. We publish the Creative Academic Magazine and will start working soon on the second issue. You will be happy to know that the theme for it will be play. Read our short introduction regarding the next issue below and get in touch if you would like to contribute a little something, ok?

Exploring the issue of play

Play in higher education? Seriously? Often we are reminded that universities are not playgrounds and that play is childish and inappropriate… Isn’t research a playful experimentation with ideas, concepts and situations, recognised as an essential activity that drives innovation, while play in a learning and teaching context is often still interpreted as undesirable especially within higher education?

In the next issue, we will explore the importance of play in higher education to create critical and creative thinkers and doers who have the curiosity, capacity and the vision to make the impossible possible.  There will be a potpourri of contributions and perspectives shared through practitioners and students eyes and minds that offer a valuable insight into the opportunities creative play presents for learning and teaching, students and their tutors.

Deadline to submit an article or digital artefact is the 1 May 15. 

Chrissi Nerantzi and Dr Alison James

draft post version 2

the power of stories or week 3 #creativeHE

This was our session around story, stories, our stories, their stories for learning and teaching. Stories we create, tell, share and live. Stories which help us learn about ourselves, others and the world around us. It became clear very quickly how powerful stories are to make emotional connections, how they help us keep memories alive but also created powerful triggers to be in somebody else’s shoes and empathise but also mirror behaviour (see also a fascinating article about the science of storytelling I came across this week). The group has started coming together and it is wonderful to see how colleagues have opened up and feel free to express themselves. We all opened our hearts and showed vulnerability. But it was ok. It was our decision and we knew we were safe within our little community.

Beyond our own personal stories we also explored the use of creating stories to analyse and synthesise in a visual way academic articles. Could this present a useful approach especially for students new to critiquing academic literature and do this within a small group and through a way that is perhaps more hands-on, collaborative and visual? Could this be a useful starter activity if we use for example the flipped classroom approach? Might be something I could discuss with Prof. Simon Lancaster for example to find out if he has used something like this or would consider using with this students? I am also thinking about my own colleagues and their own students. If you are reading this, please comment below. I would be very interested to find out what your thoughts are around this.

co-creating stories based on academic papers a kinaesthetic, visual and collaborative approach, photo a bit out-of focus, sorry… ;( image source: https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7354/16325474748_572ac6d9bd_z.jpg

While I am writing this, for some reason, my mind seems to wander already towards the next session (it is Saturday evening when I started capturing these thoughts… and the session was on Thursday). I am now trying desperately to remember what happened… Does this delay in capturing my reflection hinder me now to actually look back and remember anything specific that I would like to take forward? Or is it that sometimes things just fade away quicker than others? The bits that I decided to leave out pop into my head now… but why? Maybe because we tend to remember more the ‘negatives’, the things we didn’t achieve? I started an activity which remained incomplete (don’t know if any of my colleagues would actually know which one I mean). The reality is that there were some connectivity issues. The activity was to demonstrate something very specific… I now think that I will do the second part the activity next week, and see if it helps colleagues understand an important concept which I think is not just relevant for children’s development. Writing about it now, actually makes me change my original plan. Part two will be done next week, but the activity itself will be completed in session 5. Yes, this makes sense and fits nicely with my plans for that day. I can’t really say much more now. Well, I could but then it wouldn’t be a surprise anymore… but just happened here is, and idea developed and evolved into something else while I was in the process of reflecting on something that I had to leave incomplete during the session. I am pleased now that this did happen… and I will manage to turn this mistake if you like into an opportunity.

I was sort of checking myself the other day on what I have been modelling so far and could see that it was hands-on creativity that could work anywhere and didn’t rely on tech. Actually looking back now and specifically to the last task from last week, there was the option for colleagues to turn the stories they created within their groups into digital stories, it didn’t happen. Both groups preferred to work on low-tech activities. Then this morning, Sunday, I read David Hopkins blog post which seems very much related to my some of my thoughts regarding technology and it was a bit spooky, I have to admit, but nice also that other people are thinking about these things too.

However in both groups digital tools were used to support the activities without being prompted. In one case, the iPad became the timer and camera to capture some photos, while in the other group, one colleague used their tablet to capture notes and the mindmap. Is this what we would call normalised use of tech? I think it is.

The fresh entries from the Value Jar follow: Thank you everybody. I will continue collecting responses and we could synthesise all your responses after week 5 and see what these actually all mean for you, me and us.

Excellent session about the power of storytelling. Nice to see the group getting closer and learning from each other. Great ideas to use straight away. Thank you ;)
Realised how my own learning preference/beliefs influence and perhaps constrain my practice as a teacher.
Sharing experiences, opening up and seeing the world in a different way – tools to do this.
The realisation of the power of storytelling allowing individuals to connect with each other through verbal communication.
Explored how stories can be used to inspire and develop communities.
We explored storytelling as way of connecting students at emotional level. Instigating emotions in students to help them connect with concepts they are learning to connect to a wider world.
We reflected on using storytelling in the classroom, we created our own stories and looked at ways to introduce activities with storytelling. ;)… and it was fun!
I enjoyed the experimentation with storycubes and creating ideas together.

Can’t wait to see you all next week for more fun and play! Yes, our next session will be about play and making stuff for learning ;)

Draft No 1

Game over? No, it isn’t… or week 2 thoughts #creativeHE

On Thursday was our second #creativeHE session… well not really a session. This word takes me to a very restrictive definition of learning… if learning happens exclusively in sessions which we design for learning…. or teaching perhaps, I should say, does learning often happen outside of these sessions? An interesting study found that walking increases creativity. Walking is probably not the only activity that fosters creative juices to flow… The reality is that learning is an uninterrupted and liquid process and happens in multiple physical and virtual spaces, with and without others, with external and/or internal stimulations and often while doing other things. From multitasking to multilearning? What does this mean when we we design activities for learning to happen?

I love to surprise learners and help them make their own discoveries! I hope that colleagues saw the potential of breaking out of walls, out of stuffy rooms, out of dark and boring spaces and seek light, oxygen and inspiration in the outside world. Learning happens everywhere and all the time. Unzipping our minds from time, geographical constraints and lack of resources will help us spot opportunities for learning and teaching, in a very different and refreshing way. I think participating colleagues realised the potential and were able to experience the fruits of joined-up thinking and collaboration. We are not alone! Sharing opens up so many new and exciting opportunities. Active listening is vital. Too often we talk to hear our own voice, our own ideas but actually when we listen, when our own voice moves into the background we connect with others, discover and grow and are more able to discover common interests with others. We don’t know it all, actually we know very little, and often thinking that we know best blinds us and doesn’t enable us to spot the gems in front of our eyes.

I have been playing the Sell you bargains game for a number of years now and the first iteration when I was still living in the North-East and was a teacher trainer for adult and community learning. We transformed Newcastle City centre into a playground… for the last five years it has been Manchester… The game has changed and evolved over time. It was far too complicated to start with. Now I am thinking of changing it again. What triggered this is the measuring or scaling creativity. The game is deliberately collaborative and to neutralise competition but then there is the bit where the group collectively, and I stay out of this, votes for their favourite team based on criteria they defined. Should we get rid of this part? One of my colleagues questioned the usefulness of this. The process of establishing a way to do the voting for the best ideas, did distract a bit from the activity itself and the sharing of ideas. So could or should the voting be scrapped? Would it be better to celebrate more all ideas equally? Would this create a more inclusive atmosphere? And I am thinking now, doing this with some cake would I am sure be much much better! While I am writing this I am making the decision to try this next time but what I do need to find is a suitable place off-campus. Bringing in students would also be useful and actually I could buddy up students and lecturers… New ideas are emerging, new and old are coming together while I am typing all this with one finger on my iPad in notes. I am excited and can’t wait to see where these changes will take us next.

My thoughts appear to be random but I can see the connections and some of the opportunities for the future. I need to reflect more on Thursday, what happened, what didn’t, why and what I would like participants to achieve through this game. I know that I am critical of myself, but in this case it is for a purpose, I am really keen to make it even better. Colleagues told me that they found it refreshing to be out and about, share practices, problem-solve collaboratively and come up with creative ideas that could and hopefully will be implemented (also see their Value Jar responses below).

Normalised use? How will you use this pic David? image source https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8603/15829018954_50b9d2e390_z.jpg

At the end of our game and while we were leaving, the online dimension of the unit was brought up by some, together with the fact that some of my messages are far too long and tasks are text-heavy!!! The situation is not ideal. Not all are at p2pU yet, not all have a portfolio yet. How many feel lost and disorientated online? Did I expect too much? Familiarisation with the spaces and practices we would use during the course should have happened before we started. The opportunities were there but not used by all. How can I highlight their importance more for future cohorts? The portfolio session for example only attracted a tiny number of participants…. it was promoted as pre-course… I think this might have been the problem. I will have to rethink!!!

 

  • Loads of pics from the day and the unit can be found here.
  • Mini films in which colleagues share their ideas are here.

The Contributions to the Value Jar from this week, below. Couldn’t read all handwriting… And need to check the post-its again. But here comes what I could read and hopefully this makes sense.

Talking was really useful – sharing ideas. Enjoyed being out and about! Being creative and having time to talk to others and enjoy being creative.
Don’t concentrate on the leaves, concentrate on the roots.
How amazing to get out of room with walls and walk!
I found problem solving two ideas at once great because when you ran out of ideas for one problem, you could switch to the other one, unblocking the mental block.
Emphasis on process understanding how to structure tasks (practice) which emphasise process. Walking… I am inspired by this as a methodological approach.
It was useful to walk and talk. It’s always a good way to get ideas flowing! Great to be in a new environment with my peers too. Not keen on voting though!
Collaboration works! Especially in a different environment, with people with similar passion and different view points.
Not at all … what to expect. Very creative session. Got lots of ideas for teaching and some positive reassurance for tackling some of my present challenges. It became very clear in the discussions, that challenges we face are infoliated and need collaboration s a solution. Creativity is everywhere. You go looking was another form I
I enjoyed it engaging in conversation in dynamic environment/settings. Sharing our problems with others and finding resolution. Surroundings definitely enhanced our ideas and brought interesting topics to our conversations.

Before I forget, I would also like to add that a complete stranger approached us and wanted to know what we are doing. When we asked him what would you advise lecturers, he said the following:

Stop thinking that you know everything!

On Sunday morning I had a Eureka moment for a new activity, which I think would be of value. It was triggered by something that happened when we shared ideas at the final stage of the game and it confirmed to me that we need to listen more to what other say as this will help us make re-adjustments to our own thinking and practice. I am working on this activity now and it does involve flower pots. I think I will need the help of a designer to come upMore soon. I will make it available under a creative commons licence so others can use and adapt ;)

I or we? We or I? I and we? Glues for my flower pot activity… image source: http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/pictures/30000/nahled/old-flower-pots.jpg

… I would like to share here also that we had our very first badge awarded via pspu which went to our Ellie, Very well done!

Speak again soon,

Chrissi

p.s Draft version 2.