@GOGN_OER Days in Krakow, Poland 10-11 April 2016

logo-gogn-blue2-e14393890788191Day 1 of our GO-GN event arrived! It all started with a lively icebreaker. It really was a lovely way to help us start talking with others and spot connections and specific interest hot spots, personal and research ones. I had the opportunity to chat with Beck Pitt who I knew through her open courses and Twitter and we discovered that we both love photography. I wish I could say that I am a keen runner like Beck is… It is always strange, but in a nice way, when we finally meet somebody we have been “talking to” in the digital jungle. It is not always possible. So I feel fortunate to have met her, finally 😉 And Natalie too, who has been fantastic in supporting us and making sure that we would get here in one piece and Bea, of course too and all the rest of the GO-GN team too.

From the introductions I could see we are a multi-cultural mix of people doing research in the area of open education around the world. Prof. Martin Weller mentioned some numbers too. See image below.

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Prof. Martin Weller in action showing us the GO-GN map so to speak

Bea invited us to reflect on being an open researcher and why open research is actually good for us, for others and society. For me personally it is about the opportunity or opportunities, I should say, to connect with others and share. Share ideas and dilemmas and find ways to initiate and continue conversations but also debate. To extent our own little world and feel less lonely and get a sense of belonging. However, it is not just about, or it shouldn’t be just about seeking like-minded people. Of course, we all love to have people around us who sort of agree with us and we can just be ourselves with all the craziness and silliness this comes… at least sometimes.

While we often seem to emphasise that through open and social practices, we can connect with like minded people elsewhere and this is indeed a huge benefit for all of us, I feel that it is equally important to “expose” ourselves and our ideas to other-minded people. And social and open practices enable this too. This is where we are really challenged, stretched intellectually and start thinking much deeper about what moves us, what upsets us and gain deeper insights into what we stand for and why. Criticism and critique are valuable, even if it can be painful at times as emotions are part of this process. We are not machines.

When we keep an idea for ourselves it dies very quickly. Therefore there is no value in ideas that remain in the dark, locked away in the cupboard. They turn to dust! Ideas need oxygen and feeding to grow and evolve and people to look after them. People not just one person. One person is not enough. There is an African proverb that is very powerful “On our own we can go fast, with other we can go further”. This doesn’t just apply to our individual journeys but also our ideas and their travels.” So share freely, I would say, as giving will not just make you feel good but also give something back, as I am sure others have helped you too.

None of it can happen if there is no sharing and/or closed-mindedness. Can we be half-open or half-closed?  Is there such a thing as wide-open or open unlimited? I think we all sit somewhere on that open-o-meter and see it more as a dynamic continuum depending on the situation, circumstances and context. There is personal and professional judgement that we make each time and we decide what is appropriate and what isn’t. And sometimes, of course, we get it wrong…

I think we could say that it is a fact that the world of open wouldn’t be there, wouldn’t exist without sharing, full stop. So the people are the driving force, the force that makes things happen and change things. Glenda Cox @glencox talked on Monday about her PhD work and I got really interested in social realism (Archer). It didn’t take me long to realise what type I am… and how this translates into what I do and how I operate. We will of course have to be careful, I think, how we use that information as I wouldn’t like us to fall into another learning styles trap… I will do some more reading into social realism to better understand what this is all about and what this could mean for people, practices and innovation too, this is what interests me most.

Throughout the two days, it has been fascinating to meet other PhD students in open education from around the world and find out about their research. We were all at different stages in our journey and this was extremely valuable as we

  1. could see that we have similar challenges and dilemmas
  2. depending on where we are on our journey, we could position ourselves in relation to others and create a map looking back and ahead at the same time in what is still to come.

And this can be extremely motivational! There was no sense of competition. In the contrary, the atmosphere was very open and inclusive with a focus on individual and collective growth. After presenting our work, we were invited to respond to critical comments as well as comment on the work of our peers. It wasn’t easy at times, but then this was the point. Thinking deeper and into new directions and thinking the unthinkable is what we need to make surprising links that might lead us to new discoveries. Learning is also being in a state of discomfort… and being challenged. This is how it felt.

There were so many great learning opportunities for all of us, through each other’s work!

Jamison from the US is on a PhD programme that reminded me of a Professional Doctorate that we have in the UK. After completing his study modules he is now ready to put a proposal for his research together and start working on the thesis. My understanding is that this will be based on three papers. He shared some of his initial ideas and thoughts with us and I am really looking forward to how these will evolve and where they will take him. Jamison showed an interest in using a learning and teaching lense and his strength are the theories. Paco from Spain, is looking at MOOCs and accessibility within these, while Viviene from Brazil is going to carry out research into teacher’s professional development linked to OER and one of her outputs will be a CPD course for them. I was wondering if she could re-use an existing course that is already out there and contextualise maybe? Bernard, from Rwanda, is almost at the finishing line. He carried out research into how OER could supplement learning at HE within Rwanda where access to electricity and therefore the internet is extremely low. What stood out for me from his research is the emphasis study participants paid to policy and I kept wondering if this had to do with local and national socio-political culture(s).

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Bernard Nkuyubwatsi’s work and reminder of the challenges in some African countries

Glenda from South Africa who is now waiting for the decision by three external examiners (there is no viva in South Africa, the final thesis is submitted to the external examiners), did research in the area of quality and OER from the perspective of academics. A very interesting piece of work that also made me think about the digital residence and digital visitors model (White & LeCornu) while Sujata from India is looking at OER use within an Open University in India from a student and staff perspective; Nicolai from the Netherlands and his work has a focus on medical education and exploring OERs through the lense of eco-systems and complexity theory for sustainable implementation and Jin from China discussed the 5-minute micro-lessons which is a  government initiative which invites teachers to create short films as learning resources that are shared with learners and other teachers via the web. It wasn’t clear to me if these would be made available under a creative commons licence and I didn’t ask.

The two days were extremely fruitful. It was really lovely to see that the GO-GN organisers, Bea, Beck, Rob, Martin, Nats as well as the two fathers of GO-GN, Fred and Robert,  showed a genuine interest in our work and felt that our plans were worthwhile pursuing. For me, this event, really helped me feel part of a community and I am looking forward to staying connected and growing what we started in Krakow during the last two days. It requires feeding… in other words commitment but if we feel that it would be worthwhile for all and benefit us all, the only way to go, is together, right?

A massive thank you to the whole GO-GN team for creating this fruitful opportunity for all of us and all PhD students who were there with me for their openness and collegiality.

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Monday evening GO-GN meal: Great company and mushroom soup in bread!

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… as you can see, I wasn’t the only one taking bread soup pictures 😉

 

The storify from our tweets during our time in Krakow can be accessed here a visualisation can be seen below.

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About wheels and poems

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image source here

I am very excited as we have just started the development of the wheels app thanks to our CELT intern Stuart Bennett and Laurie Cooper from Digital Labs at MMU. Our first meeting was fruitful and started revealing the complexities of developing an app and the analytical skills needed but also the ability to seeing connections quickly as they emerge and making the links before they disappear again from our minds.

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Laurie and Stuart and our Alice on paper 😉

We used A3 sheets of paper and an online platform to capture our discussion (guess, what, we lost what we entered there… as the connection wasn’t working properly). I wish I had taken some coloured pencils with me… next time. Laurie suggested to develop the app in our heads and on paper, based on an end user. This was Alice. Stuart and Laurie had baptised her before I arrived.

During the meeting we made good progress linked to how Alice would create wheel templates that she can use to add data or just store on her device for different uses, including printing these out. Next week we are going to continue with the process of entering data and this is where all the complexity will be. I suspect… as we have to imagine the whole process and there is nothing there to compare it with in real life.

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Sam and Ellie, image source here

After leaving our meeting, we had our Greenhouse happening with Dr Sam Illingworth who immersed us into poetry. I re-discovered my love for list poems (see the one I wrote during the Greenhouse below) and can see how they can be powerful reflective tools. I just wish I had this idea when I started my PhD as it would tell a fascinating story, I think… anyway. As I am four years into this, it doesn’t make a lot of sense to start this now. Then again I thought I could have captured the data analysis that way, but again, I am in the middle of this already… what a shame.

This was my list poem contribution.

Will I?

messy

darkness

confused

struggle

HELP

moving

backwards?

HELP

hope

moving

moving

stop

go

slowly

very slowly

moving

building

building

Foundations?

HELP

I must get there

I will get there…

will I?

Then I started thinking about our app project and I would really like to trial the use of list poems to capture a reflective journey or process. As the app is a collaborative process, I feel that it would be fascinating to capture our individual and collective journey over the next six months. Will this work? Will this be of value? There is only one way to find out. I hope Stuart and Laurie will say yes to this little experiment. I think they will 😉

Calling all playful HE practitioners to join exciting book project

Dear colleagues

We would like to invite you to take part in our project to bring together global, scholarly examples of play in Higher Education.

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Is play exclusively for children? image source

Play in Higher Education is currently largely unsung, but now creeping to the fore of the attention of the tertiary sector. We have done already some work with Prof. Norman Jackson and the Creative Academic online magazine which illustrates this well. In addition  we noticed that a number of conferences on Play in HE are being held this year – surely a sign of the zeitgeist?

So do please join us in building understanding of the contribution play makes to all disciplines in the tertiary sector and circulate to your colleagues worldwide so we can make this collection truly global.

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… of all ages, image source

If you have any questions about the project do please get in touch with us and consider joining the Play in HE community at  https://plus.google.com/communities/103994615424006154336 .

For further info about this exciting project, please click here

 

All best

Dr Alison James & Chrissi Nerantzi

back home after #digifest16…

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Thank you to Sarah, Heather, Ian and John for their help with the balloons. They had no idea what would happen.

… and posting a  quick note to thank you for your kind tweets and thoughts this morning. I am delighted that my contribution made (some of) you think and hopefully consider playful approaches for your practice.

A special thank you goes to the organisers and all the Jisc team behind the scenes who made this event such a rich experience. Especially Dicky and Claire.

The slides used are below… together with some first pics and comments thanks to your tweets.

Chris Jobling kindly created a storify with the #www16 hashtag. Thank you so much.

…  the related interview can be found here.

All #digifest16 resources can be accessed here.

Eric Stoller (@ericstoller) kindly mentioned this contribution in his #digifest16 article for INSIDE HigherEd.

Chrissi
p.s.: Hopefully I will get some sleep tonight.
p.p.s: Wonderful to see so many friends during #digifest16, some for the first time outside the digital jungle.


If you would like to experience playful learning in a different way and have a bit of time next week, keep reading…

55a6f7f744985babbfe65fd209b47b1d_13During Open Education Week, we will be offering #creativeHE over 5-days, as an informal collaboration among colleagues from MMU, London Metropolitan University, Hull University, the University of Macedonia, Creative Academic and Lifewide Education around Creativity for Learning in Higher Education.

If you would like to join us, you just need to access our #creativeHE community in Google plus. Preparatory tasks and readings for the week ahead are already there. All you need to do is click here and you are there.

The initiative is also listed as an Open Education Week initiative.

What are you waiting for? Join us and share this open invitation further.

Chrissi, Sue, Sandra, Nikos and Norman, the #creativeHE team

 

The real power of digital in learning and teaching #digifest16 #www16

I have been given a wonderful opportunity to share thoughts around the power of digital in the context of learning and teaching at the Digifest organised by Jisc. Really looking forward to this great event. The programme looks amazing and I am excited in meeting colleagues and finding out more about their work and what makes them tick.

If you know me and how I work, you might suspect that I will try and do this my way… 😉 For me this will be a massive 10 minute workshop-type session, I think, so participation will be required. Risky?  Yes! Would this stop me? No.

As I would love to take you all with me for these 10 minutes, I decided to reach out for help. The title has now been announced. So, there is no way back. After thinking about what digital means to me as a lifelong and lifewide learner and practitioner, I decided to go for…

www or wondering while wandering

How does this sound to you? Can you relate to this? If it is a yes and says something to you, I am wondering if you would like to visualise your thoughts and ideas around this and share with me.  How does this sound?

The plan is to co-create a tapestry of all your contributions to frame the 10 minutes. Ody,11, my little boy,has made a great start. See below.


I really hope you will embrace this opportunity and be with me on on the day through your contributions.

Create and share your creations linked to the the www title via Twitter using the hashtag #digifest16 and #www16 and I will pick them up from there. You are very welcome to directly add your visualisation to this post as a comment too, if this works better for you. Remember to

  • add your name and/or Twitter id
  • a creative commons licence (if ok with you)
  • were you are in the world at the moment

to your contribution.

Please feel free to share this invitation with others who might also be interested in contributing.

In the next few days, I might reach out again as I think we have a unique opportunity to put our ideas forward collectively.

Can’t wait to see your creations. Thank you so much in advance.

Chrissi

 

@BYOD4L ing this week from the other side

Monday note…

“Inspired by a tweet by Emma Gillaspie @egillaspy on day 1 about a photo competition around the 5Cs (check this out at on Twitter using the hashtag #UoSBYOD4L) I plan to capture this BYOD4L week using images but also think about the 5Cs in a different light… ”

Saturday morning

yes… this was the plan at the start of the week but it didn’t come to fruition… unfortunately…

However, the competition made me think about the 5Cs (Nerantzi & Beckingham) in a new light and I started thinking about antonyms of the 5Cs and the 5Cs as a continuum. I am just adding my notes below at this stage and am exploring currently in what way a 5C continuum would be useful as a diagnostic tool perhaps for individuals and learning communities using social media but not exclusively. At work, we will be developing a mobile app which will be valuable for educators, students and many others as a self-development tool and I think one of the applications that I would like to try in the summer, when we hopefully have the first version of the app, is the 5C continuum. More about this at a later stage. Together with the 5C continuum I would also find a better way to represent the 5C at a specific moment in time and through time, if this makes sense. 

This week I experienced the BYOD4L course from the other side. As a little helper to our very first community-led January 2016 iteration with Neil Withnell, Sheila MacNeill and Alex Spiers. Sue Beckingham and I have been leading all three previous iterations with many passionate colleagues from the UK and further afield and while we did enjoy them enormously and helped us really get to know each other and find effective ways to collaborate, we also felt that a change was needed and a shift at the same time to empower the BYOD4L community, refresh the offer with new faces and ideas as well as help others develop new capacities and also share the load a bit as this is an initiative by the community for the community and now with the community. I feel it is not enough to talk and write about learning and working in partnership. Making it happen is the real value for all.

For me this week was fascinating, because it showed that we can re-use OER courses and we can work with other peoples course materials and we can make it a success. I guess it also depends on the materials, how flexible they are. Our approach has been inquiry-based and the course course can be fully personalised and contextualised. I think this might be an important enabling factor. Letting go and loosing control can be scary but also very liberating and I have experienced how empowering this can be when working with others who are committed practitioners. Committed to the course but also the team and the community. It definitely needs to be a team effort. Otherwise it won’t work. Together, we can grow ideas and take initiatives into new and exciting directions. I am very keen to continue exploring this way of working  with others in the open and am excited about what might happen in the future, or what we might create in the future.

Friday evening, our last BYOD4Lchat was an experience in itself and something we didn’t anticipate of happening. Twitter to crash? Alex said it is our fault… I know he is kidding but I am sure it is partly our fault as we were using it too… Experiencing something like this in the middle of a live event were you are not in the same room with others leaves you feeling hopeless. First, you think it is your connection, as I did and blaming my boys who were both on computers…, then you try different things to re-connect and nothing works… you feel stuck. You want to reach out and let everybody know but you can’t, at least you can’t through the same channel. Just imagine the whole internet would suddenly disappear under our feet…

I think we need a plan B for these things and plan C and this should perhaps be communicated at the outset of each event. So what could we have done? My first thoughts would be the following

Plan B: Move the conversation to another social media channel, in our case this could be the BYOD4L community in Google plus. If this fails?

Plan C: Re-arrange after connection has been re-established to minimise frustration. 

Really would love to hear your ideas about the above.

The organisers decided to use the DM feature in Twitter to co-ordinate activities during the BYOD4L week and I think this really made a difference to speed-up communication, troubleshoot in no time, support each other, often instantly, but also acknowledge each others’ contributions and really proof that this is a team effort where the collective comes before the individual. I saw all these things happening this week and it was wonderful and made me smile many times.

I hope everybody enjoyed BYOD4L this time as much as I did and found it useful too. It definitely helped me reflect, plan and act. The week and what happened during this week   seeded new ideas for me, so thank you all! Sheila has written an excellent summary of the week. Please access here.

BYOD4L will be back in the summer as a 24h experience.  The BYOD4L community is open all year round so just jump in to connect, communicate, curate, collaborate and create. The community is  here. For the BYOD4L day, all we need is people who would like to organise it with others. Get it touch if this could be you. We are looking for colleagues from different parts of the world.

 

 

 

 

handing over the baton to the community @BYOD4L @LTHEchat

We have heard, read and probably experienced that OERs are often under-used… does it have to be this way? And what about OER courses?

Orr et al. (2015) in a recent study recognise among others that OERs can bring educators together and trigger opportunities for collaboration especially in the area of professional development of educators.

I have been exploring various approaches and strategies to achieve this with many passionate colleagues and closely with Sue Beckingham over the last few years and (co-)created openly licensed courses and initiatives in the area of informal open cross-institutional collaboration in academic development since I did my MSc in Blended and Online Education with Prof. Keith Smyth which helped me discover opportunities in this area and I am since January 2013 a PhD student exploring open cross-institutional professional development.

Scalability is often mentioned as something we haven’t worked out yet… an answer could be cross-institutional offers perhaps? I have been interested in this with a focus on creating conditions for versatile and collaborative learning experiences within supportive communities.

Sustainability is perhaps something that needs more our attention as well? How often have we heard projects that have received seed funding disappearing after this dried out? And what about non-funded grass-roots open initiatives that solely rely on good will and sustained commitment? Do they have the potential to live longer? But how?

To sustain open courses and initiatives that are of value for others, make them truly democratic, inclusive and collaborative, I think one way of doing it could be through community engagement – community driven leadership that empowers and creates shared ownership. It requires the community to play an active role in shaping and reshaping the course or initiative and taking it into new and exciting directions. It might also be a way for open practitioners to give something back to the wider community while developing new capabilities?

Projects which grew out of seeds I planted, and are out there in the open are changing… What I just described has actually started happening and I am including specific examples here:

The Teaching and Learning Conversations (TLC) webinars: Since September 2015 we introduced a rotating organising team. I am extremely impressed with how well it has worked so far. Dr Rod Cullen, Prof. Ale Armellini and Calum Thomson are definitely taking the TLCs to the next level where one person couldn’t.

The Learning and Teaching in Higher Education tweetchat (#LTHEchat) had a mixed team last term but from this term we have 2 colleagues from the LTHEchat community, Dr Stephen Powell and Ian Tindall leading together with a colleague from the HEA, Kandy Woodfield, as the #HEAchat and the #LTHEchat have come together, which will be beneficial for the wider academic community. I am really looking forward to this new collaboration and the forthcoming #LTHEchats.

The open course Bring Your Own Devices for Learning (BYOD4L) is going to be offered for the 4th time next week (11-15 January 16). Colleagues who have participated and facilitated in previous iterations of the course, have kindly volunteered to become organisers. I am  extremely grateful to Neil Withnell, Sheila MacNeill and Alex Spiers for taking on this exciting opportunity forward. I would suggest to join BYOD4L from Monday for a week of development where students and educators are coming together to learn about how they can utilise their smart devices for learning and teaching. It has been a very popular course so far, creates a real buzz every time it is offered, has lead to rich learning and changes to practice and generated many opportunities for collaboration that stretched beyond the course. Jump into the BYOD4L community directy! No registration is required!!! Read Sheila MacNeill’s related post here.

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The title of this post says… handing over the baton… it doesn’t mean that I will disappear. Relay only works with great team work and that means sustained commitment! In my new role, I will be there to support the teams as long as needed, more silently in the background 😉

 

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Hands Passing Baton at Sporting Event, source here

I am looking forward to finding out where this new direction in my thinking and practice will lead us. Might this be a valuable path for more democratic, distributed and participatory leadership of open practices and help us sustain and grow practices further?

To an exciting year ahead!

Your comments and ideas are, as always, very welcome 😉

Chrissi

 

References

Orr, D., M. Rimini and D. van Damme (2015), Open Educational Resources: A Catalyst for Innovation, Educational Research and Innovation, OECD Publishing, Paris.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264247543-en

#blimage response and new visual trigger(s) > Rules, what rules? ;)

#blimage what is that now? Was my first reaction.

Yes, “image” was the vital ingredient that made me click on the link… as I love working with images, pictures, I love taking pictures, I love making pictures, I love expressing through pictures and I love using pictures in my teaching, learning and development but also research.

So I started reading David Hopkin’s post. I have to admit that I was confused. I guess I read it too quickly and it just didn’t make sense. What was I asked to do and why? I think I now understand that I have been asked to connect my thinking to the image David tweeted and then perhaps invite somebody else to respond to my visual trigger(s). Yes, you guessed right… there will be more than one. I am already thinking of this instead of capturing my thoughts around David’s picture. Is my brain future facing?

Is this a chain exercise? Is it about exploring the concept of reciprocity? Is it about speaking through images in a literal and metaphorical way? Is it more about the process than what we create and share? Or both or even more than that? Or following blindly what we are asked to do? But then again I could say no… Why didn’t I? Why didn’t everybody else? Did we also pick people we knew would respond? Did anybody sent the request to a complete stranger? Who broke the chain and most importantly why?

At the moment of writing this, I am in the train and on my way to London with no internet access. It is very very early. I feel that there are information missing… I don’t understand what I have been asked to do and how it relates to anything else and what the purpose of this activity actually is. What are we trying to achieve? What is the purpose of this activity? I feel like a student… a student who is lost and disorientated. What wants to know more… But also a students who is reactive to what what they have been asked to do… But there is also something about this task that fuels my curiosity and anticipation for exploration and discovery.

David’s picture echoes emptiness somehow. I have to admit that I don’t think that I would pick this to use on my blog… I didn’t connect with it immediately and I am not sure if I am fabricating what follows…

Yes, I am picky with images. I wouldn’t just use any randomly to decorate my blog as they have special meaning for me. If the picture doesn’t talk to me it will never make it here… Often I spend a lot of time, picking the right ones…. anyway, this one is here now… but not because I picked it…

In my imagination I can see people sitting there, avoiding looking at each other when I think of an airport while they would be talking in a learning situation. In my classroom they would and they would be making stuff as well and moving around. Learning doesn’t really happen properly when you are sitting down all the time! The fact that these seats are static is a disadvantage but we can turn this into an opportunity. We can use the floor, walk around, leave this space and go elsewhere. Why is this not happening enough when we think about fixed classrooms, for example. Why do we feel prisoners and often victims of a system? What is our responsibility?

The picture also reminds me that I will be flying to the sunshine very soon and therefore it also fills me with anticipation and joy. It might be me and my boys sitting on these seats. How will we behave? Will we feel in transit and be in our own little pink bubble of shared past and present, looking forward together to the future? We have each other. Why do we need anybody else? This question is indeed problematic, think about it for a minute.

While travelling on the tube to go to #legoHE15, I was in this space which did remind me of David’s watercolour painting and my challenge? Was I living it suddenly?

I also noticed just now that this is actually a watercolour painting? I guess when I first looked at it on my tiny phone screen, I couldn’t see the difference… my eyes are getting bad…? Is this painting a re-creation of what we see with our eyes, or what we see through our eyes? Copying reality? I am not good at this but does this mean this is not useful? I like paintings with depth, paintings that make me think. But then this  did but in a very smooth way. I guess this is ok too. What I am trying to say is that imaginative pictures speak to me more. Pictures that are interesting, unusual, not a direct copy of reality…

Not sure I did what I was asked to do but I feel I have done a little something to contribute to #blimage. I hope this means something to somebody.

Feeling dizzy writing all this. Should really stop… Still on train travelling…

The above was written in the morning on my way to #legoHE15 which was organised by Alison James in London. I am now at station waiting for my train home. Thinking again of the original image while sitting on a similar seat as David’s challenge pic. Everybody around me is using their phone… me too… are remote conversations easier? Is it a way to escape what surrounds us? Can we be here and everywhere at the same time? Is this a good thing? Always?

I have an idea for a new picture challenge and will add them (yes, there will be 3 + 1 in total so that the person has some choice. Will add these when home (ok they are here now). I hope the people who get my #blimage challenge can relate to one of the photos in a creative way and make a meaningful connection to learning and teaching… I have no idea where this exploration is leading us individually and collectively… It is however, fascinating and I can’t wait to find out…

Thank you David for involving me. Would love to hear your thoughts on my thoughts.

Did my thinking travel in the wrong direction?

Here come the 3 plus 1 images I would like to hand over to Debbie Baff and Stephen Powell. I am in holiday mood so they had to be bright. What do your eyes and/or  mind see? How do you connect with one of these pictures? What learning and teaching metaphors do you see in them? Pick just one and create a blog post that helps us see the connections you made. Share your stories back with me and colleagues via #blimage. Thank you in advance for taking on this visual challenge.

Thank you for the challenge David and Steve. I hope you don’t mind me adding the “pick-your-own” feature 😉

Chrissi

Visualising FOS as a pizza (globe)? #fos4l

FOS in 5 days, a pizza, a globe in 5 sections. What I noticed happening each day using symbols: question marks, hearts, stars. Frequency and size of these also matters. What do you notice?


Adding colour: from dark to light. Is this what FOS really means? I think some of you now know. Think of photo-synthesis, photo-graphy and you will get the real meaning of FOS 😉 In Greek it is φως


Darkness everything around FOS?


The 5 sections, which day is which? My interpretation. How do you see it?


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Not the end, not over. What do the spirals represent? Basically this image shows the FOS in 5 days and beyond. Would be good to have an interactive model… with colour movements as well. I can see it now in front of my eyes but would need some help to make this happen digitally.

 
Late addition (17 Aug): An important omission was observed by Ian Tindal which is now included in the below. Thank you Ian for making me reflect on this aspect of FOS.

  
Confession… I feel guilty as I just now (Sunday evening) managed to do what I said I would do in my last post about FOS and my experience. But perhaps this small time delay was useful to really filter out my interpretation of what happened last week.

Can’t wait to hear if others connect with my finger drawings (made on iPad using sketches, the free version, see here)  and what they mean to them.

Post also written on iPad and uploaded directly. Sleep well everybody 😉
Chrissi